Birds of Boulder County

    Featuring Photographs by Gerhard Assenmacher

    This page is a work in progress. We have at least one beautiful photo now of every bird species likely to be seen in Boulder County. Information about each species is still being added as it becomes available. Check back often to see what’s new!

    The Boulder County Audubon Society greatly appreciates the images donated below. Most are Gerhard’s photos, but he wants to acknowledge the following photographers who also contributed to this project:

    • Jennifer Price
    • Don Whittaker
    • Scott Rashid

    The expanded version of each image bears a copyright notice, photographer’s name and information about each species.

    Boulder County Species of Primary Concern (Hallock and Jones 2010) are listed in italics with special concern designations in parentheses. Visit www.bcna.org for access to the complete Boulder County birds of special concern list, which was compiled by Boulder County Nature Association in cooperation with Boulder County Parks and Open Space.

    We have Steve Jones to thank for the status, population and conservation information for each bird. Gerhard, Steve and Amy Schlotthauer worked together to make this on-line field guide possible. They each would like to thank the others for their unique contributions to the project.

    Click images to expand them and see species information, click “X” to return to birds or the play button to automatically scroll through each item.
    Use arrow keys to advance forward and backwards through the images.

    Swans, Geese, and Ducks


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    Pheasants and Grouse


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    Loons and Grebes


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    Bitterns, Herons, and Ibis


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    Vulture, Hawks, Eagles, and Falcons


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    Rails, Coot, And Crane


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    Shorebirds


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    Gulls and Terns


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    Pigeons and Doves


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    Owls


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    Nighthawk, Swifts, Hummingbirds, and Kingfisher


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    Woodpeckers


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    Flycatchers and Vireos


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    Corvids


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    Lark and Swallows


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    Chickadees, Nuthatches, and Creeper


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    Wrens, Gnatcatcher, Kinglets, and Dipper


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    Thrushes


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    Starling, Pipit, and Waxwings


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    Warblers

    Separating Mountain Warblers by Nesting Habitat and Song

    McGillivray’s, Virginia’s, Wilson’s, and Yellow-rumped Warblers are most easily separated by song and habitat, since they are often difficult to see as they hop around in the foliage of mountain conifer forests and wetlands:

    Species Nesting Habitat Song
    McGillivray’s Warbler Riparian shrub Seven or fewer hoarse “shree” notes
    Virginia’s Warbler Open forests Nine or more descending “see” notes
    Wilson’s Warbler Willow thickets Series of “chee” notes on same pitch
    Y.-rumped Warbler Denser forests Slow tinkling or trilling warble


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    Towhees and Sparrows


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    Tanager, Grosbeaks, Bunting, and Blackbirds


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    Finches and Weaver Finch


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